Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Photographing a baby - and having fun doing it!

You may remember a blog post from a while back, when my niece came down to our house for me to take pregnancy photos of her.  In that blog post, I said that I was new to pregnancy photos and had to figure out the best angles and poses. Well...once again I was outside my comfort zone taking photos of a 5 week old baby. But, just like before, we just had some fun and tried different things, as you will see in this blog post.

(Canon 1DX, Canon 100mm macro lens, f/4, ISO 640, 1/100 sec)
We started with a white furry piece of material which we put over a stuffed chair. We had Penelope wear a cute little hat and I started shooting some photos. I started with the Canon 1DX and a 100mm macro lens and also used the Canon 24-70mm lens for many of the shots.

(Canon 1DXCanon 100mm macro lens, f/2.8, ISO 1250, 1/125 sec)
With a baby so young, it was hard to position her head. So I just let her wiggle around and took photos when I saw the opportunity. I really love this one with her looking up at me.

(Canon 1DXCanon 100mm macro lens, f/2.8, ISO 320, 1/80 sec)
As you know, I like trying to find good photos taken from a different perspective. With that in mind, I moved my position and focused on her hand, which was up by her ear. I love the way that a simple image like this can say so much.

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens, f/4, ISO 640, 1/100 sec)
It was just before Halloween and we had a bunch of pumpkins laying around the house. Being a goof ball, and just messing around, I grabbed a couple of the smaller pumpkins and turned Penelope into "Princess Leia".

(Canon 1DXCanon 100mm macro lens, f/2.8, ISO 640, 1/125 sec)
We then switched the white material for this checkered material and added some color to the photos.

(Canon 1DXCanon 100mm macro lens, f/2.8, ISO 640, 1/160 sec)
Most of the time, I am working to maintain perfect focus on her eyes, but for this photo, I shot at a wide aperture and focused on her hands, lettering her face become part of the background.

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens, f/2.8, ISO 320, 1/640 sec)
And for a couple of minutes, Penelope decided to take a nap. I guess my photography lulls people to sleep. :)

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens at 45mm, f/4.5, ISO 320, 1/125 sec)
My wife is a little strange and has two mailboxes in our backyard, to keep her favorite tools. We thought it would be funny to put the baby girl in the mailbox so that her mom could have a photo announcing "a new baby has been delivered".

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens at 45mm, f/4.5, ISO 320, 1/125 sec)
And here is a crop of the same image. I don't know about you, but this makes me laugh.

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens at 39mm, f/4.5, ISO 320, 1/125 sec)
After some good laughs, we asked mom to step into the shot to get this.

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens at 57mm, f/5.6, ISO 320, 1/125 sec)
My wife found this old red wagon at a garage sale and thought that it would be a fun prop. Running out of ideas, we decided to put Penelope into the wagon, surrounded by our pumpkins and fall leaves. We actually didn't have good enough leaves, so I sent my daughter 4 blocks away to collect some from a very colorful tree. This photo shoot was truly a family affair. (Photographer's note: My wife was holding the little girl in this position, and I removed her hand, arm and shoe using Photoshop.)

(Canon 1DXCanon 24-70 f/2.8 II lens at 41mm, f/4.5, ISO 320, 1/200 sec)
And for this final photo, we just laid Penelope down nice and easy and I quickly shot this. She is so darned cute!

ONE MORE THING...If you have not yet entered the "Jeff' Favorite Things" contest, make sure you do so HERE. It is your chance to win more than $11,000 worth of the best photo gear from my sponsors!

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.
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Sunday, November 16, 2014

An open letter to Apple Computer

I have been using Apple Computers for more years than I can count, and I am one of Apple's biggest advocates. Our house could double as an Apple store, with numerous Mac computers, laptops, iPads, iPhones, Apple TVs... Yep, I drink the Apple Kool-aid.

A couple of weeks ago I upgraded to your new Yosemite Mac Operating System (version 10.10). I was initially excited to see that the new OS let me use my 4K monitor through DisplayPort with no problems. At that point, I was glad that I made the switch.

But sometimes being on the leading edge can feel more like being on the bleeding edge. For the last couple of weeks I have had inexplicable issues with my wireless Internet connectivity and slow connection with the Chrome browser. I even have a couple of applications that are not running very well. But I expect to have a couple of hiccups when installing a new operating system. But then I hit the big problem. My mail stop sending. Then my mail stopped receiving. And the worst part is that I am using YOUR mail application on your new OS on your new computer! 

I then turned to Google to research this and see if others are having the same problem, and I see that there are a ton of people having this trouble and that this is a known issue. Really? There is no excuse for this. I know that you can not test with every third party application...but this is your own application on your own OS. Was this not tested thoroughly?

I have to repeatedly zap my PRAM just to make my computer work. Ughh.

As someone who runs my entire business on Apple products, I am really disappointed!

Jeff Cable

You can reach me at jcable@jeffcable.com (I can read your response on my iPhone or iPad, since I may not be able to receive the email on my computer)


Thursday, November 13, 2014

Update to the contest - MORE products added


As many of you know, the contest is now live. Well...it went live yesterday and then I had a couple of my favorite companies join in. Acratech has now added their Swift Clamp and Sigma has added their crazy sharp 50mm 1.4 lens!!

The new list is:

* DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ Drone
* Canon 70D DSLR camera with 18-135mm IS STM lens
* Canon PIXMA Pro-1 Printer
* Wacom Intuos Pro Medium
* 32GB Lexar Professional 1066x CF Card or 32GB 600x Lexar Professional SD card (2 prizes)
* Drobo 5D
* Sigma 50mm 1.4 lens
* Lexar HR-1 Workflow Solution w/ 2 Readers
* Gitzo GM5561T 6x Carbon Fiber Monopod
* Photo Mechanic software (2 prizes)
* One year subscriptions to Zenfolio (2 prizes)
* Scott Kelby Autographed Books - “The Digital Photography Book, Part 5: Photo Recipes” (5 prizes) and "Lightroom 5" (2 prizes)
* KelbyOne: One year full memberships (2 prizes)
* LowePro ProRunner 450AW Backpack
* JOBY Suction Cup (2 prizes)
* Epson R2000 printer with Velvet Fine Art paper (8x10), 5x7 pack and 4x6 pack of photo glossy paper
* FotoFusion Extreme software (2 prizes)
* B&H $100 gift certificates (2 prizes)
* Acratech GP Ball Head with lever clamp and a Swift Clamp
* M&M Photo Tours - $750 credit on one of their International photo trips (come with me!)
* BlackRapid straps - CrossShot strap, Sport strap, Yeti strap (3 prizes)

Yes, there will now be 33 people winning these prizes!

Make sure to enter the contest HERE!

I hope you win one of these great prizes!!!

Jeff

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.
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Wednesday, November 12, 2014

It's time for the "Jeff's Favorite Things" give-away, and there are $10,000 in prizes!!!


Remember when Oprah Winfrey would give away her "Favorite Things" to her audience? Once again, I have been working with all my friends in the photo industry to collect my favorite photographic tools to give away to you. Last year I gave more than $3000 worth of goodies and I thought that was so cool. Well...guess what? This year all my favorite companies came through in a big way and the prizes are worth $10,000! Yep, that is $10k worth of the best photo gear, and all for you. These are all products that I use and love every day.

Here is everything that you can win:

* DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ Drone
* Canon 70D DSLR camera with 18-135mm IS STM lens
* Canon PIXMA Pro-1 Printer
* Wacom Intuos Pro Medium
* 32GB Lexar Professional 1066x CF Card or 32GB 600x Lexar Professional SD card (2 prizes)
* Lexar HR-1 Workflow Solution w/ 2 Readers
* Gitzo GM5561T 6x Carbon Fiber Monopod
* Photo Mechanic software (2 prizes)
* One year subscriptions to Zenfolio (2 prizes)
* Scott Kelby Autographed Books - “The Digital Photography Book, Part 5: Photo Recipes” (5 prizes) and "Lightroom 5" (2 prizes)
* KelbyOne: One year full memberships (2 prizes)
* LowePro ProRunner 450AW Backpack
* JOBY Suction Cup (2 prizes) 
* Epson R2000 printer with Velvet Fine Art paper (8x10), 5x7 pack and 4x6 pack of photo glossy paper
* FotoFusion Extreme software (2 prizes)
* B&H $100 gift certificates  (2 prizes)
* Acratech Ultimate GP Ball Head
* M&M Photo Tours - $750 credit on one of their International photo trips (come with me!)
* BlackRapid straps - CrossShot strap, Sport strap, Yeti strap (3 prizes)

Yes, there will be 32 people winning these prizes!

Sign up here for a chance to win!  The more people your refer, the more chances you have to win.


Wednesday, November 5, 2014

New York - Central Park in Fall colors

Last week I was in New York to speak at B&H and for the Photo Plus trade show. Last Tuesday afternoon, after doing my "How to shoot great senior portraits" talk at B&H, I went out to Central Park with the goal of photographing fall colors. I was armed with my Canon 5D Mark III, Black Rapid strap (which I love!), and a Tamron 28-300mm lens (which is a nice light walk-around lens). It was not the peak of color, but still provided some really nice photo opportunities. Come on...let me take you through the park...


I have photographed Bow Bridge many times in the past, but never with fall colors. I went to the far side of the bridge and climbed up on a rock to get this perspective. I love shooting this bridge at an extreme angle to emphasize the architecture. There were many boaters that came into the frame, but I waited for only one boat, with someone wearing good colors, that would fit the scene and reflect off the water.

After shooting this shot, I ventured over to the flowers that you see on the bridge.


I was looking to see if there was a good shot of the flowers, when I noticed this butterfly. I quickly reframed my shot, focusing on the butterfly, but also using the fall colors in the background. I took numerous photos of the monarch butterfly on the yellow flowers, and then he took off. I fired off a couple of frames and got lucky to have a nice sharp image.


While strolling along one of the walking paths, I saw this tree on the edge of a lake. I really liked the way that the orange leaves created a nice pattern in front of the bright yellow tree in the background. I shot this at f/5.6 to make sure that the focus was only on the foreground tree.


This photo shows a different view of the season. Instead of showing a whole tree, I isolated this one branch to show the turning of the leaves. Nature's pallet is so awesome!


For any of you lucky enough to visit Central Park, you will recognize these light posts which are everywhere. I decided to photograph one of these lights in front of a magnificent tree. Once again, I used a fairly wide aperture of f/6.3 with my zoom lens at 300mm to compress the background and draw the viewer's eye to the light.


I saw this reflection and could not help myself. So cool!


At one point, I came across an area with these beautiful flowers. I composed this shot numerous ways, but really liked this one photo the best.


After hours of walking the park, I came around a corner of this lake and saw the late afternoon sun hitting these trees across from me. I took many photos of this scene before the light dissipated, and grabbed this one with the boater in a red shirt (again adding to the scene) and the goose heading towards me.


Ahhhh...so romantic. I had to grab this shot!


The direct sunlight had come and gone, but the flat light helped me get these shots.



I saw this break in the trees and was shooting photos of the distant trees through the larger hole to the right of the frame, when I noticed these boaters through another smaller break in the tree. I quickly refocused on the boaters and zoomed out to include them in the photo. (Photographer's tip: Whenever you are taking photos, be aware of everything around you, as many times you will find more interesting subjects that were not initially focusing on. Look behind you, above you and really dissect a scene to find something beyond the obvious.)


I saw these trees through a small break in the bushes to my left. I could not help myself, so I hopped a small fence, walked through the trees to a clearing, and shot this. (Don't worry - I was very careful and didn't trample anything.) It was just too amazing to pass up!


It was just before sunset when I grabbed this shot near the Bethesda Fountain.


And if you know me, you know that I just can't stop shooting when I am in the zone. The light had dropped and most people had put their cameras away, but I saw this as another opportunity to shoot some motion blur of the passing carriages. I lowered the ISO to 250 and changed the shutter speed to 1/2 second and panned along with the horse and carriages.

I hope you enjoyed our little walk through Central Park!

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.
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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Back button focusing - Why and how to use it (video)

One of the most common questions that I get after people have watched some of my videos is, "How do you setup and use back button focusing?" So...I decided to shoot a video with me showing you how to set it up (using a Canon DSLR in this case) and also why and how to use it.


You can watch the video here on the blog or directly from YouTube here.

And here is a quick written overview of back button focusing.

What exactly is back button focusing?

This is a technique where you change the setting of your camera so that the shutter button triggers the shutter but does not initiate the focusing of the camera. Instead, the autofocus of the camera is initiated with a separate button. In my case, I choose to use the AF-On button on the back of the camera.

Why would you want to turn off focusing from the shutter release button?

Because there are many times when you will want to prefocus on a spot and then shoot without having to wait for the camera to achieve a focus. Using the back button focus technique, you can set a point and then shoot (and reframe) as much as you want without having the camera change the focus.

There are many times when I shoot in Servo focus (otherwise known as follow focus) where the camera will change the focus depending on where my lens is pointed. I like the having the ability to use this at some points while shooting and not at others.

If I am shooting an event where the subject are at the front of the Temple or Church, I like locking the focus on them and knowing the shutter button will only be used for capturing photos. This is similar to turning off the AF switch on the lens. I can use the back button to focus or manually focus.

I hope this helps all of you!

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.
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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Another "real world" test of the Canon 7D Mark II - Shooting a high school football game at night

You may have read my original blog post about the upcoming Canon 7D Mark II, which I posted a week ago, and showed sample photos taken at ever increasing ISO levels. For the first test, I did take the new camera out with a 100-400mm lens, but was in a VERY dimly lit football field. This last weekend, my daughter asked me to shoot some of her high school's football game for their yearbook. This was at her high school which has better lights. And this time I brought my Canon 70-200 2.8 lens and shot all these photos at in Aperture Priority mode at f/2.8, setting the exposure compensation to -0.7 to keep from blowing out the white uniforms, and set the ISO levels anywhere from 5000 to 16,000.

I think you will be really impressed when you see how clean and sharp these images are, even at these crazy high ISO levels. And, in case you are wondering, I did not do any noise reduction on these jpg images.


I started shooting at ISO 6400 to obtain a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action. On this particular photo, I was at 1/1250 sec.


I was really happy to grab this fast action and still have excellent image quality.


Pointing the lens into a darker section of the field, for this photo I was only able to get a shutter speed of 1/640 sec. But, as you can tell, this was a fast enough shutter speed to freeze the action in this case.


After shooting numerous photos at ISO 6400, I decided to bring the ISO down a little to 5000. This photo is nice and clean at this high ISO. You can see the noise level in the cropped image below.


The kid next to me was shooting with a Canon T2i with a variable aperture lens. Knowing the age of that camera (which can't shoot at very high ISOs) and the limitations of the lens, I figured he didn't stand a chance to get a decent shot.


Here is a photo of one of the kids diving straight ahead for a touchdown. Because I was shooting straight ahead with the lights all to the sides, and I had the exposure comp at -0.7, the runners face was very dark. For this photo, I did use the shadow/highlights adjustment in Photoshop to bring his face out of the shadows.


After scoring a touchdown, it was time for the opposing team to kick the extra point. I moved to a 45 degree angle and shot this. I prefocused on the ball and shot this with a shutter speed of 1/800 sec.


And then, just for fun, I decided to crank up the ISO to 16,000. I think that this photo is a perfect example of why I really like this camera. Is there noise in the photo? Yes. And if you look at the crop below, you will see the digital noise in the photo. BUT, when looking at the photo above, it is a fine image and plenty good enough for the high school yearbook. Sometimes us photographers obsess over the noise levels, but I would rather have a noisy image and freeze the peak of action than get a blurry unusable photo.



Another shot taken at ISO 16,000.


This and the remaining 3 photos were all taken at ISO 8000.



I do like the crop factor of the Canon 7D Mark II, allowing me to get nice tight shots even with a 70-200mm lens.


All in all, it was a really fun night shooting photos for the school and getting a chance to test the 7D Mark II once again.

I am still amazed at how good these DSLR cameras have gotten in the last 5 years!

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.

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Friday, October 17, 2014

Flying Over Switzerland - A new video I created using the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+

As I mentioned in a previous blog post, I shot a fair amount of aerial video (using the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+) while on vacation in Switzerland a couple of weeks ago. I finally had a chance to edit the footage and put it together for all of you.

There are scenes flying over Rheinfall, which is Europe's largest waterfall, some of the vineyards and farmland, and over some amazing castles.

You can view it here on the blog (below) or see it larger and sharper HERE!:



I hope you like it.

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Monday, October 13, 2014

The Canon 7D Mark II - First reaction and test of the high ISO abilities

A couple of days ago, the UPS guy delivered me a sample of the new Canon 7D Mark II. I posted a photo of the box on Facebook and immediately got hundreds of messages asking me to test this new camera and give you all my feedback.

The number one question asked by you all, and the height of my curiosity as well, pertains to the high ISO abilities of this new camera. So, I charged up the battery, waited for the sun to set and went out to the nearest Friday night high school football game.

Before I get into the photos and levels of noise at high ISO, let me tell you about my first thoughts when shooting with the new 7D Mark II.

When I removed the camera from the box, I was excited to see that it uses the same battery as the Canon 5D Mark II and 5D Mark III. This is great since I already have many of those batteries and chargers. This also means that it is easy for people to purchase extra batteries from almost any camera store. I slipped the battery into one of my existing chargers, topped it off, and popped it into the camera.

Now it was time to put in some memory cards. I put in a 128GB Lexar Professional 1066x CF card into the CF slot, figuring that this new camera would take full advantage of the UDMA7 speed. Many of you know that I was disappointed that Canon did not make the SD slot in the 5D Mark III in the newer UHS-I standard. This means that the 5D Mark III could not write to an SD card any faster than 133x. And that is just not fast enough! So, the burning question in my mind was "Does the 7D Mark II support the most current SD spec (which is now UHS-II)?" And I was bummed to see that the SD slot is only UHS-I, once again showing that Canon is behind in their adoption of the newer standards. What this means is that the SD slot is much faster than the 5D Mark III, but not nearly as fast as it could be. I guess I will stick with CF cards to get the fastest buffer clear in this camera.

When I turned on the camera and set the current time and date, I entered the menu system to change some of the settings.

Note: I always change the following settings in any new Canon camera that I get:

* Auto rotate - I like the image rotated on the computer but not on the camera. I always select the middle option, which shows you more of your portrait photos on the LCD of the camera.
* Release shutter without card -I have no idea why Canon ships the camera with this turned on, or why anyone would want this on (other than for camera stores to demo). Turn this off!
* Highlight alert - I like this turned on
* I usually choose to shot RAW instead of JPEG (Since there is no RAW converter for the 7D Mark II in Adobe Camera Raw at this time, I have chosen JPEG, but that will change soon.)
* Change single shot to continuous mode. I like having the option of shooting numerous photos at a time.
* I change the focus to be center point by default
* I customize the "My Menu" to add my favorite menu options. And I just noticed that the 7D Mark II has multiple tabs on this menu so I can add more than 6 favorites. Very happy about that!

I was surprised to see the advanced focus modes, which I have on the Canon 1DX, on this much lower cost sports camera. Yeah, I call this a sports camera, because of the high speed shutter, but there is not reason why this can't be used for portraits or other types of photography. Speaking of focus, I love that the 7D Mark II has 65 focus points. This is very handy when shooting sports, or anything for that matter, since you have so many more options of where you want your focus to be in the frame. When shooting the football game, I did move the focus points around and tried different focus modes. All worked as expected and the focusing was fast and responsive.

I connected a BlackRapid camera strap to the camera, attached a 100-400mm lens, and I was ready to go out and shoot the night football game.

The first thing that I noticed was how small and light the camera was in my hands. Very different from the big old 1DX that I am used to. And when shooting in burst mode the first time, I was surprised at how quiet the shutter was. Compared to the 1DX, the 7D Mark II shutter is much quieter! After shooting for a couple of minutes, I decided to see how quiet the silent mode was, so I switched the shutter mode to silent mode. The shooting speed went from 10 frames a second to just 4 frames a second. This may not seem like much, but after shooting at 10 frames a second for a while, it seemed REALLY slow. I quickly switched it back to regular mode.

Another thing that really freaked me out, was the cropped sensor. I have not taken photos with anything but a full-frame camera in years, and it was a little strange. When standing on the sidelines, using the 100-400mm lens, I could not capture a photo of an athlete on the sideline with me, from head to toe. With my full-frame cameras, I can do this. But, with that said, it was fun to have the extra reach, effectively making the 400mm reach to more than 550mm.

I normally shoot in RAW mode, even when shooting sports. The reason is that I always want the best quality photo, and RAW files have more data than compressed JPEGs. For this test, I set the camera to JPEG mode. I did this because there is no RAW converter for the 7D Mark II yet, and I would not be able to process the images. And since I want to show you photos directly out of the camera with no adjustments, a JPEG works better anyways.

Earlier I told you about the memory card slots, and that I was using the fastest CF card on the market. Well...with the 7D Mark II in JPEG mode, I never had a buffer fill. At one point, I must have shot 60 photos in one burst and could have kept going. I know that this will not be the case with RAW files, but it shows that the camera to card speed is very good and will be ample performance for almost any shooting.

OK, now let's get to the burning question of high ISO shooting.

My goal was to create a test that was "real world". In other words, I wanted to use a variable aperture lens that many of you (and I) could afford and might use on a daily basis. I chose the 100-400mm lens which shoots between f/4.5 and f/5.6.

I showed up at the high school field and was totally surprised at how dark it was. I was looking for a tough shooting environment, but this turned out to be even tougher than I planned. I guess I am spoiled shooting the Olympics and professional sports, as the lighting is usually very good. Not in this situation!

I figured I would start shooting photos at ISO 3200 to get a fast enough shutter speed to capture the athletes. Not a chance! I set the camera to ISO 3200 and was only getting a shutter speed of 1/80th. Uh oh! Time to push the ISO into the crazy numbers which I usually avoid.

Here are a couple of photos captured from that game.

This first photo was taken at ISO 16000 at f/5.6 which gave me a shutter speed of 1/500 sec.

You can click on this to see a larger image
Another photographer, William Gerth, was at the game and was nice enough to let me mount his 400mm f/2.8 lens to the 7D Mark II so that I could test the camera at a faster aperture and lower ISO. This next photo was taken at ISO 6400 at f/2.8 which gave me a shutter speed of 1/800 sec. Both have digital noise, but are useable photos for sure. Heck, if it wasn't for these high-ISO options, there is NO WAY to get a decent photo from this night game, regardless of what lens I was using.

You can click on this to see a larger image

As I was walking away from the football game, I turned around and noticed the moon in the sky. I decided to shoot a photo of the moon, handheld at ISO 1250. The aperture was 5.6 with a shutter speed of 1/1000 sec. I did crop in a bit on this photo, but left enough of the black sky for you to see the low level of noise in the dark area of the photo.

You can click on this to see a larger image

Since I really could not shoot the game at "reasonable" ISO levels, I decided to do a test at my house. I set up a football helmet and shot the exact same scene at various ISO levels. This is similar to test I did when Canon came out with the 5D Mark III. I think that these photos tell the story much better!

Note: All the photos below are full resolution JPEGs straight from the camera with no noise reduction. You can right-click on any of them to save and view them at full size.

ISO 100 - Shutter speed 1.3 sec -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 160 - Shutter speed 1.1 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)
Just in case you are wondering why I tested ISO 100 and ISO 160, I just wanted to prove to myself and others that indeed, Canon's ISO 160 is cleaner than ISO 100.

ISO 400 - Shutter speed 1/3 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 800 - Shutter speed 1/6 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 1600 - Shutter speed 1/13 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 3200 - Shutter speed 1/25 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 6400 - Shutter speed 1/50 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 10000 - Shutter speed 1/80 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 16000 - Shutter speed 1/125 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 25600 - Shutter speed 1/200 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)

ISO 51200 - Shutter speed 1/400 sec   -   (Canon 7D Mark IICanon 70-200mm, f/5.6, Gitzo tripodAcratech ballhead)


One thing thast I found very interesting is that the file sizes are so different for each of these images. The higher the ISO, the larger the file size. At ISO 160, the file size is 5MB, whereas at ISO 6400 the file size is 8MB. At ISO 51200, the file more than doubles to 12MB. Crazy, but true.



So, what is my conclusion about the Canon 7D Mark II? I don't want to give this one back to them! This camera offers a whole lot of features and image quality for the relatively low price of $1799. And even though I have a Canon 1Dx, I love having a smaller and lighter camera that can shoot 10 photos per second, and do so with really great quality. And there are times when having a crop sensor would be beneficial to get me a little closer to my subject. Basically, I see this as the little brother to Canon 1DX for a whole lot less money.

If you have been waiting to purchase a new camera for almost any type of photography (especially for sports and wildlife) this is a great choice!

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If you are interested in purchasing any camera equipment, please click here to go to B&H Photo, as I get a referral from them if you enter this way. I would really appreciate that.
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And stay up-to-date with all my photos and videos on my Facebook page.