Thursday, July 6, 2017

What would you like to see on the blog?

In all the years of writing this blog, I have never stopped to ask all of you what you would like to see here. Well...today is that day.

For the last 10 years I have shared photos and stories from my travels, written product reviews, shared daily stories from the Olympics, shared personal highs and lows, and tried to inspire all of you to create great photos.



But now it is time for you to tell me your ideas and suggestions.

Here are some questions for you:

* Would you like to see more product reviews? If so, for which products?
* Would you like to see more or less technical articles?
* Are there certain genres of photography that you would like to see on the blog more often?
* How important are the camera settings (for each photo) to you?

I promise you I read every blog comment and email. So please let me know what you would like to see here on the blog. Bring it on!

You can leave a comment here on the blog or email me.

I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

Jeff

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13 comments:

Jeff said...

Hello Jeff:

I have enjoyed all your posts even those about genres of photography that I generally don't shoot. It gives me a "taste" of the various types of photography. I also appreciate your generosity in sharing your work because I know how time consuming it is.

One thing I would enjoy seeing is a periodic, perhaps twice a year, review of your five/ten best shots of the year (thus far) AND why you think they are your best, i.e. what is about that particular shot that makes it stand out from your other good or very good work.

Do you have any stories about serendipity in your work? Have you ever gotten a great shot that you hadn't planned? Have you loaded your photos into Lr or Ps and seen any surprises? What interesting things have happened to you or your work that turned out differently than you anticipated (for better or worse)?

I know you are now doing workshops and perhaps you can garner some lessons from those to share with your blog audience. What are the two or three misconceptions or misunderstandings your participants bring to the workshops?

Are there any gizmos or gadgets you use that help you with your photography even if they are not essential, but just add a nice touch. (I like the post about cleaning the camera sensor. This is something I know we need to address more frequently.)

Of course please do continue to share work from your assignments when possible.

Thanks for asking!

Warm Regards,

Jeff Ross

David Olshan said...

Hi Jeff. I would like to more of your workflow after the shoot, specifically how you get your RAW images to final export to the client or blog with whatever post-processing takes place in-between. Your images are always so clean and seem minimally processed. I am a big fan of your work and your blog and look forward to more great content.

Shell Mel said...

I'd love to see some step by step for the beginner. I have a Cannon T3i and still know very little about it! :( And the little I've learned ... I find it hard to grasp and remember. Thank you for all you share with all of us! I've loved your adventures!

JarrethS. said...

Jeff,

I would like to see more technical info on sports photography, especially when it comes to photographing fast action in low light conditions using 50mm f1.2, 70mm-200mm f2.8, and 100mm-400mm f5.6 glass. With football season starting soon, I find myself photographing in mid-afternoon light conditions and into early evening. As long as I have early afternoon light I can push my ISO and play with my shutter speed to capture good action images, but once I start working with stadium lighting my images start getting darker or they get more motion blur. My camera choice for sports photography is a Canon 7D MII but may upgrade 6D MII.

Thank you,

Jarreth Solomon

Anonymous said...

Hey Jeff. Im having some really trouble figuring out how to set up a good way to save all my files in Lightroom. Some tips of how to set up an archive and how you organise all your photos, organise your favorites from the rest, etc. I think a blog about this (if there hasnt already been one) might help more than one of us. Thanks

Beth said...

I'd love to see more portrait photography. I do appreciate knowing the settings for your pictures. Thanks for writing content for us every week!

Russ White said...

Hi Jeff
As a Canon shooter. I would like to see your evaluations of new Canon products.
On shooting, nice to see camera settings.
On photo, like to hear your opinions on why you posted photo.
On RAW processing, would like to know final settings on photo you post.
Would also like settings that you did in Photoshop on photo.
Nice to read about your travel photography.
Regards
Russ White
Langley, B.C.

Linda Allen said...

Hi Jeff,

I would like to see (1) info on your process for delivering images to clients, (2) technical info on Events such as lighting setup and camera settings, (3) tips on transitioning into a photography business and other business tips.

I am a hobbyist and enthusiast still working a full-time job (information technology). My favorite genre is Event Photography. Right now I am sharpening my skills by shooting family events with the goal of shooting for paying clients.

You are one of my favorite photographers and I always enjoy your B&H sessions and I LOVE your Blogs! :-) Maybe one day in the future, I can attend one of your Photo Tours or Appearances.

Thanks for your generosity in sharing your knowledge with photographers like me. I really appreciate it and you!

Take care,
Linda Allen

Jeff Cable said...

THANK YOU TO ALL OF YOU FOR YOUR COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS!

I am collecting all of them and will use those as content ideas moving forward.

I really appreciate all of you taking the time to write. In total, I have now had more than 100 emails and suggestions here.

Jeff

Bonny said...

Jeff, Hi. I love your work and your blog posts. I would love to see more on how you choose lenses for different needs. I specifically am looking for a good lens for dance photography in low light situations where I can't use tripods nor preset how far I will be from the subject.
I have been advised to get the new 70-200 f2.8, but it's really heavy and a little pricier than I'd like to spend. What do you think?

Also do you always suggest Canon over Tamron?
Thanks again. Bonny

Stenomicra said...

Jeff, I like your blog as it is.

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Corey Nook said...

Hi Jeff. I've been following you for several years now and have been very inspired by your presentations where you give great tips and teach us all so many of the things you've spent years learning about photography.

One of the things you always mention is that a good photographer should know within a few seconds of entering a room/building/location how to adjust the camera settings to get correctly exposed shots. I've always thought it would be very informative if you would shoot some videos of you doing a "real" shoot (portrait, wedding, etc.) where you explain what you're thinking as you move around the shoot and set and reset camera settings and why. Since there are so many things to think about during a shoot like this, I think it would be very helpful to get a glimpse into your mind on how you adjust settings, think about different shots, posing, lighting, etc.

Thanks again for all your hard work and I look forward to continuing to learn from your work.

Corey